Friday, June 23, 2017

Outfits vs. Fashion Accessories

No outfit was complete without accessories by 18th-century middle- and lower-class women. There were two types of gowns: the open robe and the closed robe.

Accessories included neckwear, gloves, pockets, masks, pocketbooks, redicules (handbags), muffs, and pocket watches.

Suntans were not at all fashionable in these early time! Women desire their skin to look as white and spotless as porcelain. They took great care to protect their faces from sun and wind by wearing masks. Green silk masks prevented sunburns in summer, and black silk or velvet masks kept the face warm in winter. In a way, the silk masks played the role of the modern sunglasses.

Fashion was modesty oriented. Women did not feel comfortable wearing the low-cut dresses in the 18th-century. For this reason, it was a trend to wear neck accessories and kerchiefs to cover up the neck and upper chest. Neckwear pieces were also practical and used to stay warm on cold days.

Fans was an important accessory for a woman to keep them cool on a hot summer day. These portable air-conditioners were often decorated with beautiful designs. Also the fans were a tool of communication and were used for flirting.

Protection of the hands led to the necessity to use gloves and carry muffs. Both gloves and muffs protect the hands from sun and wind, and kept the hands warm during the cold winters.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

The Chick and the Duckling: A Story for Younger Children

A Duckling hatches out of its egg.
"I'm hatched!" he says.

"Me, too!" says the Chick.

"I'm going for a walk," says the Duckling.
"Me, too," says the Chick.

"I'm digging a hole," says the Duckling.
"Me, too," says the Chick.

"I've got a worm," says the Duckling.
"Me, too," says the Chick.

"I've got a butterfly," says the Duckling.
"Me, too," says the Chick.

"I want to swim," says the Duckling.
"Me, too, says the Chick.

"Look, I'm swimming!" says the Duckling.
"Me, too," shouts the Chick.

The Duckling pulled the Chick out of the pond.

"I'm going in again," says the Duckling.
"No me," says the Chick.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Sun and Wind

In Miami, ordinary days are always victorious
And filled with the same warmness and gentleness;
The summer is endless for us -
Fulfilled with triumph and hospitality kindness...

In the hot summer time the King of Sun
Rules until the hurricane season,
Taking time off for disputes
And following the fable from Aesop -
The Sun argues.

The mighty Wind from the far seas
Blows on trees
And throws,
And sways
The branches and leaves.

'Miamians' hurry indoors;
looking for water, ice, and shelters;
Then barricading the homes,
And waiting, and waiting for the contest's victors.
People try the their best at the Wind might.

Every year we learn more
The easier influence masses
With kindness and gentleness
Then with force and war!

IT, 2007

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Fashion and Poetry

What could be in the world of Fashion and Poetry that unite them in one entity?
The answer is short - the Majesty Inspiration. Both Fashion and Poetry are siblings and have one parent called Arts. To create a successful peace of art, we need inspiration, the muse that feeds the creative process of  art and design.

There are endless interactions a muse can take - a truly wonderful day, Greek goddess, fairy-tale princess, woman, celebrity, artist, slogan or motto, or combination of things and events.
There are many studies that include samples of fashion inspiration from the first couturier Charles Frederick Worth and his wife; Elsa Schiaparelli and the Surrealists; Yves Saint Laurent and Piet Mondrian; Oleg Cassini and Jaqueline Kennedy; Audrey Hepburn and Hubert de Givenchy.

For example, Alexander McQueen's crafty carryalls have inspirational equation of a Celtic prayer-cloth tree plus friendship bracelets and plus 18-th century British needlepoint. Another sample from contemporary fashion could be the Miu Miu's plushie stompers. Add a dog collar plus Paris Hilton and plus Elmo, and the summary illustrates the season's most memorable accessories.

A truck with an advertising slogan passed by and made strong statement, but what if we take these words and describe something else by telling a new story and in the way we creating new information? As a result, a poem is born out of the inspiration of few words. For example:
"Dorothy was right, no place like home for solders in fight that making the heroic flight..." (IT, 2007)


Thursday, June 1, 2017

They Come! The Merry Summer Months

They come! the merry summer months
of beauty, song, and flowers;
The come! the gladsome months that bring
thick leafiness to bowers.
Up, up, my heart! and walk abroad; fling cark
and care aside;
Seek silent hills, or rest thyself where peaceful
waters glide;
Or, underneath the shadow vast of patriarchal
tree,
Scan through its leaves the cloudless sky in rapt
tranquility.

(William Motherwell, fragment from the poem
"They Come! The Merry Summer Months")

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Summer Time

 
Summer time starts with flowers


 
Tea time starts with flowers: Gerbera Daisy.
Celebrating summer with nostalgic floral display.
Delicate, bright and bold;
pretty and delightful summer-in-bloom
will enliven any room in someone's home.

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Ishtaboli or Lacrosse Game

The Choctaw men (from southeast Native American tribes) loved to play Ishtaboli, a stick and a ball game that the French colonists renamed Lacrosse. The game was so violent that the Choctaw called it "the little brother of war." The Choctaw built huge playing fields that could hold up to seven hundred Ishtaboli players at one time.

To play, warriors and nobles would wear loincloths with fringed belts and elaborate structures covered in egret feathers that stuck out behind them like tails. They carried long sticks made from wood with webbed ends woven from strips of deer hide.